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Inglés

Guatemalan migration to Chiapas

There is no evidence that Guatemalan immigration to Chiapas has adversely affected the working conditions of native laborers in Mexico’s southernmost state. In fact, in the case of Guatemalan women, their migration seems to have increased the earnings of local women.

Exclusionary and Informal Welfare Systems in El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala

El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, the three countries that make up the Northern Triangle of Central America, are known for exclusionary and inadequate welfare regimes that promote the emigration of their citizens. All three countries are characterized by poverty and inequality, especially in rural areas. Honduras, in particular, lags behind due to multiple levels of structural inequality.

Welfare regimes in El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala

El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, are known for exclusionary and inadequate welfare regimes that promote the emigration of their citizens. All three countries are characterized by poverty and inequality, especially in rural areas. Honduras, in particular, lags behind due to multiple levels of structural inequality.

Central American transit migration through Mexico

The number of irregular Central American migrants in transit through Mexico to the United States, mainly from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador - the Northern Triangle of Central America has risen considerably over the past three years, totaling approximately 392,000 in 2014, just under the record set in 2005. The current flow almost tripled its annual average between 2008 and 2011, fluctuating around 135,000 migrants a year.

Organized civil society in response to transit migration through Mexico

Over the last two decades transit migration flows through Mexico, mainly of Central American migrants, have grown substantially. This phenomenon has created a wide solidarity response in civil society in Mexico involving different activist groups such as NGOs or religious groups as well as individual volunteers; legal experts, professionals, academics and lay citizens. They together represent a rich rainbow of activities and causes that have actually conformed the new migration agenda in Mexico.

Honduran migrants in Mexico

Migration is not a linear and sequential process. Migrants adapt their strategies and change their plans according to both obstacles and opportunities they face during their transit. Consequently, locations where migrants originally intended to simply pass through can become their destination (at least for a period of time). In this way, temporary locations can become more or less permanent.

Central American children and youth schooling in Mexico

Although the number of Central American migrants in Mexico continues to be lower than the population in the United States, we know very little about Central American children and youth—as well as their families—who are established in Mexico as a temporary option or as a destination. What are their lives like? What disadvantages do they face in order to achieve full integration into Mexican society?

Governmentality and violence towards Central American migrants in the Gulf of Mexico

Although the number of Central American migrants in Mexico continues to be lower than the population in the United States, we know very little about Central American children and youth—as well as their families—who are established in Mexico as a temporary option or as a destination.

Legalizing the City: Informal Settlements and Regularization Processes in Tijuana

For several decades, the phenomenon of irregularity in urban land tenure has been central element in the growth of Latin American cities. In the case of Tijuana, informal settlements have proliferated through the city’s history as a result of spectacular population growth.

Transboundary Water Conflicts in the Lower Colorado River Basin: Mexicali and the Salinity and All-American Canal Lining Crises (e-book)

Irrigation water users and managers experienced two critical and emblematic transboundary water conflicts in the lower Colorado River that affected the people’s daily lives, particularly in the Mexicali Valley region. The institutional analysis approach employed has a comprehensive scope that describes in detail the features of the conflicts.